Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Feedsack Collection with Rhonda!


This is the quilt that started it all for me. I saw this picture and I had to make one. While researching what kind of prints this quilt was made of I discovered feedsacks. Thank you Madam Samm for allowing me to be a guest blogger on one of my favorite blogs and to share pictures of my favorite textiles. I'm Rhonda from over at TheOldeStoneHouse where I would love to live and lead a quiet simple life.

What do you think of when I say Feedsacks?? Some of you may have grown up with them and know exactly what I'm referring to. Others this may be a new adventure for you.

Do you think of these?? The off white bags with print on the front .....Like these




Or these


(Photos courtesy of Coopersville Farm Museum.)

In the 1030's through the 1950's you could buy dry goods in a bag that then could be reused for anything you would use yardage for. It was 100% cotton and wore very well. These bags came in several sizes. The largest one being a yard when opened. They came in all different prints and colors. It was not unusual to find several colorways in the same print. They cam in stripes,checks,floral,geometric,plaids and novelty prints. The novelty prints are highly collectible today.







Of course you want to see some of the quilts in my collection. I picked a few very special ones for your enjoyment.



Each color...each leaf of this one is made up of 1 single piece of feedsack appliqued down in a leaf pattern. I believe from the dimensions that the sack was divided into quarters then cut into a leaf. It is an absolutely gorgeous piece of craftsmanship.



Grandmothers flower garden always intrigue and overwhelm me. As much as I would like to think I would do one of these...I have to be honest with myself and know my limits.

Same with the double wedding ring. Love it but probably won't. Both are great examples of what can be done with fairly small pieces of sacks though.




Check out the hands on this feedsack Sun Bonnet Sue. They are full of individual french knot clusters.




Along the journey of finding information on feedsacks I was fortunate enough to find a whole group of women who predominetly work in only feedsacks. What a thrill it was to be able to trade pieces of sacks with these ladies. You see there is over 2,000 leaves on this quilt with each leaf measuring only roughly 2"x 1 1/2". So I carried a plastic template to every event and lecture I could when I knew there might be feedsacks there. Thus an obsession was born. I'd like to call it simply a collection but if you ask my hubby it has gone much, much farther. Once I learned their rich history I began singing their praises to all who would listen.
Thanks for listening.

Hope to see you again Rhonda x

25 comments:

  1. That is a quilt I have always loved and thank you for sharing your quilts, I am in love with 1930's prints.

    cheers
    Christine

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  2. I love feedsacks. :) I have a stack that I rarely allow myself to cut into. Some were my mothers and some I've bought at antique shops. When I was a little girl I remember my grandmother having dresses made from feedsacks. Some of those ended up in her quilts later. Great post! blessings, marlene

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  3. Thanks for sharing Rhonda! I remember feed sacks and I am only 52! Mom would prod my dad to move all the bags of flour in the store so she could find 2 prints that were the same. This didn't always happen but she was very pleased when she did. Belinda

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  4. Oh yes, I know all about feedsacks, but I just cannot cut into them. I take them out and pet them! your quilts are stunning! Thank you so much for sharing.

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  5. Your feedsacks are wonderful! I love the quilts made of them and the stories behind the use of them. Thank you so very much for sharing yours :)

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  6. My mother grew up with feedsack clothes and has related many stories about the work that went into getting the fabric to feel nice and soft. I especially love the grandmother's flower garden quilt as I am making a double one too - so now have an idea for a border design. We have lots of double wedding ring quilts -- and both my grandmother and mother have made many that were given to others as gifts. Lots of good memories come from reading your stories. Thanks.

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  7. Hi Rhonda. What a nice post. Although I don't remember feed sacks, I did have the opportunity to go to a "Feed Sack Quilt" exhibition a few years ago. Two ladies, and I cannot remember their names, had published a book on feed sack quilts, and their exhibition was in my area. What a wonderful lesson in history, and such amazing talent. Wouldn't we all have a blast if they could package flour and sugar like that today!

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  8. Great to read about the feedsacks.... and now to use them too.... I love the quilts you have managed to collect...
    Hugz

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  9. I had several feedsack outfits as a child. My mom used anything she could find to make me clothes - mostly play clothes.

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  10. I love feedsacks and really enjoyed this post. My mother would, too, as she remembers feed sacks very well. I have just a couple full feedsacks but have several quilts with many feedsack prints in them. Treasure every one! Your feedsack quilts are beeeeeautiful!

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  11. I have quite a few of the canvas - feed company logo sacks. Most of them are the chicken feed as we had a lot of chickens at one time. My few lovely florals my daughter decided they would make great dollie clothes and cut chunks out of the centers many years ago. Lovely show and tell of some vintage quilts.

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  12. I love the feedsacks. I collect reproduction fabrics but do not own any feedsacks yet. These quilts are amazing. Oh, to have the time to make these beautiful quilts but sadly I must work to support my habit (buying fabric and anything else that goes with quilting)!!!

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  13. Thank you for the trunk show. All the quilts are lovely. I may have to keep my eye out for feedsacks!

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  14. Thank you for showing all these lovely quilts! I enjoyed reading the post, and seeing the feedsack prints. I can't even imagine appliqueing all those leaves!
    Jacque in SC
    quiltnsrep(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  15. I buy Lapina brand flour that comes in cloth sacks. Winco carries it next to the other brands of flour. Throughout the West, I've also seen it on the Mexican Food aisle since it's tortilla flour.

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  16. Really nice quilts. Who would ever have thought to make a Hawaiian applique quilt from feedsacks? Wow! Thanks for sharing.

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  17. Good Morning Rhonda...WOW, what an appreciation I have in your collecting and designing such outstanding quilts. Your leaf quilt I embrace for the depth, detail and eminent visual. I met a lady a year ago who collected these and made them into quilts, really there is no comparison, yours are without a doubt incredible pieces of ART. Thank you for enriching my palette this morning...

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  18. Wow, that quilt is AMAZING, thank you so much for sharing.

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  19. Thank you for sharing these! I imagine that I have some feedsacks in some of the quilts in my collection of family quilts. I love looking at all of the little novelty prints. The leaf quilt is a wonderful way to showcase a collection!

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  20. Oh how I love this post! It makes me want to plug in the featherweight, pull out some 30's prints, and create something wonderful. I so needed this inspiration as I've been in a bit of a sewing slump.

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  21. Fascinating! I love reading about the rich history of quilting!
    Thanks for sharing such beautiful pieces of art!

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  22. I grew up in the city, we had no use for feed, but my uncle worked in a hotel and the flour used in their kitchen was delivered in cloth sacks. When I was a little girl, all of my grandmother's dish towels were made of the flour sacks my uncle brought home from work. They made short work of drying the dishes.
    Thanks for sharing your love of feed sacks.

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  23. Gorgeous quilt and great posting, love the history and the quilts, thanks Michelle.

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  24. Wonderful quilts. Thanks for sharing!

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  25. I'm a scrap quilter and once when talking about feed sacks with my MIL - I said you must have collected one in each fabric. With a shocked expression she declared "No, you tried to get enough of the same to make a dress or a good quilt! LOL! doni @ Oregon coast

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