Thursday, February 10, 2011

Take a closer look....little windows!

Hi All, it's Valerie from www.PastimesOnline.ca back again, thanks for so many of your wonderful comments here in the past and on my blog www.PastimesOnline.ca/Vals-Quilting

Today I thought I would do a demo on one of my favourite techniques - Cathedral Windows. This is a hand technique where you take a light fabric like muslin fold and stitch then add a piece of patterned fabric for the "window" part. It's generally done by hand and can be easily adapted to any size. Here's Google's image gallery when you search for Cathedral Windows Quilt - isn't this sew amazing, I love it so I thought I would share it with all of you.

This one here is approx 16"w x 16"h x 4" deep - this was one of the first projects I made using this technique, and I've received so many compliments on it:) People just want to stop me everywhere and figure out how it's made? Have you tried this before?

Here's another tote approx 8"w x 12"h x 4" deep with an adorable pocket and ruffle, perfect for taking your hand piecing and stitching projects with you:) OR pack a lunch in this...



Here's one that Danielle made, it's the perfect hostess gift with a bottle of nice wine in it. Also, she did her's with all the same colours for the windows, using our Burgundy dupioni silk.

Here goes, ready to try something easy and fun? Don't be shy if your not a hand stitcher or piecer because this technique is super easy, just take your time.

2- 9" squares muslin, plain stitching needle, basic sewing thread to match your muslin.

Iron in 1/4" all the way around
Press all your corners in towards the center


Now with a small whip stitch, stitch the "X" closed you can do a slip stitch also so your stitches are completely hidden. You'll barely see your whip stitches if you choose to do it this way:)

Once you have both seams sewn shut, connect all 4 corners into the middle





Now repeat for your second square. The one thing with this technique is you need two squares to create one "window".

Now, connect your two squares together with a whip stitch (showing) or a slip stitch (invisible)




The best fabrics to use for the "window" parts are scraps, pick a theme, reds, blues, or pinks and browns, or just all scraps - is sew adorable too. Cut your squares 2.5". You can pin this center square in place if you like, I always found that the pin got in the way :)

Fold the center part of your background over your window fabric and begin stitch it down using a slip stitch or a blind hem stitch - you want this to be invisible.

When stitching, you want to make sure you only go through the folded background piece and your window area not into the background because you actually want to be able to put your fingers through the openings to give it the 3 dimensional effect.



Sew, what do you think? Is this something you'd like to try?

Would you be interested in making one of our totes? If so, email me (valerie@PastimesOnline.ca) and I'll send you a free pattern link to download:) This PATTERN IS ONLY AVAILABLE TODAY...

Also, if you're interested in learning more about Pastimes Online and what's new with us, sign up for our quarterly NewsLetter: The Times which includes our newest goodies, highlights from our blogs, and other special thing's you'd sew love.

Well thanks again Madame Samm for having me, I love playing around over here and I hope I've inspired your viewers just a little. Until next time, stay happy and creative, Valerie

52 comments:

  1. Good evening, morning Val...I gotta get to bed...but I just got in and I am still awake but I should be asleep..but not sew tired that I don't notice that baby BLUE mat..I want me one of those lol...tired of green...lol. Ok, "squirrel"...long story....anyway your cathedral windows...ok, I had seen these ONCE, but had no idea how or what to make of them..but THIS...ok this tut...pretty amazing...now since I sew enjoy hand sewing...this would make a pretty neat mug rug...yes??? Lol Ahhh question..when you drop your little square in there do you turn the edges down are they raw and you stitch that down or do you needle turn the edge down and slip stitch all around to hide the edges....Ok, now I am tired...lol. maybe when I read this in the morn, it will make no sense at all.." squirrel" lol. nighty nite ..great tut. ( I think ) noooo I know it is good. .wink

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  2. Cathedral windows is one of my all-time favorite blocks, but I've never made one. Maybe this is the year! Thanks for the lesson.

    Leslie S. in MN
    esclante at comcast dot net

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  3. I would love to make the larger tote. i have made cathederal windows, buthave done the first few steps on the sewing machine and the remainder by hand. I like your technique it becomes very portable!! thanks a bunch

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  4. I have already emailed you for the link. So excited to try this! Thanks so much for sharing.

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  5. So effective and such clear instructions... thank you....
    Hugz

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  6. Thank you, I've been thinking about trying cathedral windows but hadn't found how to do it. This is a very timely post for me!

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  7. I, too, use the method of machine sewing the first few steps. And I add a little thin batt with the 'color' window square. Then when I sew the turn over , I use pearl cotton and quilt thru the whole piece - then my quilting is all done. I know there are several methods to the 'windows' block - thank you for sharing your tutorial with us - I like the handbag made with them - very unique!

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  8. Nice! I have wanted to make some of those blocks but they always look so daunting. With your tutorial it looks like a nice little project.

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  9. Thanks for such a great tutorial. Cathedral windows was something that I have admired. But been way to intimidated to try. After seeing this I may give it a go. This looks like such a wonderful way to use up scraps too. Another thing I love.
    This could be a start of something new and wonderful or just a terrible disaster. But lets go with the first idea, positive thinking!

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  10. I can't wait to start. Thanks for sharing this.
    Roos

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  11. Ohhh my grandmother made 4 of them when she thought she was going blind. She passed before she finished the last one, and I have that. I really should get that out and work on it, now that I have seen this. She even left all the little windows for me to finish it with. Thanks for sharing it brought back many great memories!

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  12. I used to make these a lot. Thanks for the tutorial, they are a great technique to have in your quilting repertoire.

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  13. I love your blocks...I have one I am working some...I never thought of making a tote bag from them, but I have about that size comolete...Maybe I should consider that as I will never get enough done for a top.

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  14. I love Cathedral Windows! I made a pillow once, I had intended to make a quilt, but it ended up a pillow. I have more patience now than I did then. I think your tote bag is delightful. I wouldn't have thought to take the Cathedral windows into something like this, it looks just delightful!

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  15. Oh, dear, another hand sewing project that looks addictive..... wait, I mean YAY!!!!!!! Thanks for sharing!!!

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  16. That looks so great! Thanks very much for the tutorial. I am going to give it a try!

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  17. I have had this on my list to do for some time. I need to move it up the project list :)

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  18. Thanks for the great tutorial! I've always admired cathedral windows and never knew how they were made. I may have to give it a go. I love the bag you made!

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  19. VEry clear instructions..Love the wine bottle holder!

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  20. Thanks for the motivation! I saw a quilt once in a show that used a cathedral window variation to make dragonfly wings. Now that I've seen the process, I may be able to figure out how to reproduce that idea.

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  21. WOW...that looks like a ton of work and it's so beautiful! I couldn't imagine all that work on a bag...I would probably never finish it! What an amazing job she did!

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  22. Cathedral Windows are one of my favorites. Thanks

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  23. Fantastic tote and useful tutorial! I think I'll try some of these on a small creation. Tiziana

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  24. Cathedral Windows is on my going-to-make-someday list.

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  25. Loving your tote! never thought of making one with Cathedral Window technique.
    Tks fr sharing this easy-to-follow tut!
    xoxo

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  26. Hi Everyone, I'm sew glad you LOVE it as much as I do :) Thanks for all of the great comments - I'm glad I chose this one to share obviously worth it;)

    Stay happy and creative
    Valerie
    Chestermere, Alberta, Canada
    http://www.PastimesOnline.ca/Vals-Quilting/

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  27. Wow!!! This is truly stunning:) Thanks for showing us how to make it:)

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  28. I've never tried cathedral windows because it looks so hard but your tutorial made me think I might actually be able to do it! Thanks Val. :) blessings, marlene

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  29. Aww you make it look SO easy! Cathedral Windows have always been a mystery to me - but maybe now with your tute I'll be able to try one...or two! Thanks! xo, Nan

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  30. Thank You for instruktion how to make it.
    Greeting from Sweden in snow.

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  31. Cathedral windows are stunning as are yours! I have never made one as I had no idea how but your tutorial is great! Thank you for taking the time to show us.

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  32. Cathedral Windows are great quilts...but I have never tried to make one. Thanks for sharing the tutorial, you took some of the fear out of me and I think I can give them a try one day.

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  33. My sweet mother took up quilting on a whim and the very FIRST quilt she ever made was a Cathedral window quilt. She couldn't pick something easy..oh no, my crazy little Mama. However, Bless her heart..that's what we say in the south when we're getting ready to "diss" someone...she used these gosh awful polyester fabrics from our clothes which happened to be those late 60's early 70's pantsuits. Remember those anyone? Gag! I treasure the quilt but it isn't prize worthy to anyone but me..just as it should be. I laugh every-time I look at the thing because it says so much about her personality and where I get mine from. BTW, the quilt weighs a ton!! It's everyones' "go to " quilt on theri bed during the winter when you need an extra blanket.
    Your post brought back some very good memories. Thanks Val
    Blessings
    Gmama Jane

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  34. What a great and easy to follow tutorial! I've wanted to try this for so long! Sent you an email for the pattern. Thanks for sharing!

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  35. i will have to find my catheral piece and make this bag. it was a ufo, but once i find it, it will be my new bag.

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  36. I've just started doing these, but by machine!

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  37. Thanks for the lesson, I really want to make one of these.

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  38. Oh Valerie! Now I understand!! I will deifinately be trying cathedral windows. You make it seem almost painless (LOL). Thank you, Dianne

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  39. Valerie - this was an absolute great tutorial. I love the hand stitching so I can do it anywhere (and I was getting a little bored with hexies).

    Thanks - I will e-mail you my address for the pattern.

    Hugs - Marie

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  40. Val, Thank you for the helpful tutorial on cathedral windows.

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  41. Beautiful! I have sent for your pattern, thanks so much!

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  42. When I was 10, we went to visit my aunt, and this was the quilt she was working on. The first quilt I had ever seen. You brought back great memories. Wonderful tutorial!

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  43. I have seen these before but had no idea how to make them. Thanks for showing us!

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  44. I think I am just squeaking in on the deadline for the link to this pattern - I would love to make this block but haven't found a good tutorial. Thanks for sharing. Here is my email:
    micheletimms at gmail dot com
    Thanks!!

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  45. Great tutorial. I've always loved the Cathedral Window. I saw a queen size quilt and it was gorgeous....I love hand work and now with this tutorial I'm going to give it a try. Love the larger tote. Thanks for sharing. Hope I'm not too late for the pattern....

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  46. Val, this is one thorough tutorial. One I will be copying today. You make it look easy too. I have always admired these from a far. No more, I can do it yes I can. Val taught me. You are a terrific poster, is that what we call you? Regardless, I love coming here for all the inspiration.

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  47. I would love the pattern. Thank you for the visual specifics in your great tut!

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  48. Thanks for the tutorial - this is lovely :)

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  49. I love this block. I have made a baby blaket using 30's fabrics for the "windows" and I love it. I would love to make a tote bag! I never thought about that. Thanks for the tutorial.

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  50. СПАСИБО ОГРОМНОЕ!!! Давно искала как это делается!

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  51. Great post and excelent tutorial. I've always loved the Cathedral Window design and have wanted to make it in the traditional method, like what you have shared. Thanks so much for your tutorial and inspiration. I definitely want to use this insights. Love it.

    SewCalGal
    www.sewcalgal.blogspot.com

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  52. Oh my word! I can't believe I stumbled upon this tutorial! My grandmother (who passed away 12 years ago) made these but I never knew the name. I've recently started quilting and have wondered how Granny made these beautiful squares. I even asked her sisters and they didn't know. Now I know and can make them like Granny did! Thank you so much. This really is a dream come true for me.

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